Making the Most of gmail’s Priority Inbox

Recently I’ve been playing around with the filters and priority inbox in gmail to help keep myself organised.

I’m one of those people who struggles to remember the millions of small tasks, ideas and ‘to dos’ that occur throughout a day. I’ve tried many ways of managing various ‘to do’ lists such as ‘tasks’ in gmail, ‘reminders’ on my iPhone and iPad, and even setting up a checklist in Numbers on my iPad. Oh, and then there’s the sticky notes upon sticky notes on my desk. Unfortunately the problem is I never remember to check my ‘to do’ list.

For work, I always have my inbox open and so I started to think about how I could use this to remember to do things, without cluttering up my regular inbox. This is where the use of Priority Inbox combined with a filter work well in gmail.

setting up your filter in gmail

Setting up a filter in gmail

Firstly, I set up a filter to filter emails from myself and with the subject ‘to do’. To do this, click on the small down arrow in the search box at the top of the screen, fill in the relevant details, then select ‘Create filter with this search’.

Next, I need to tell the filter what to do with these emails. I want it to apply a label to the emails, so I have set up a label called To Do List.

The second step of this process is to set up your Priority Inbox so that you have a section that displays only emails with theTo Do tag attached to them. This keeps them separated from the rest of the mail, making it easier to see your To Dos and your other emails. To do this, click on the cog wheel in the top right corner, then Mail Settings. Then click on the Inbox tab. If you don’t have your priority inbox already turned on, you do this in the first section. In the second section you can use the Options links to choose what to display in each part of your Priority Inbox.

Priority Inbox setup

Priority Inbox setup

Now, whenever I need to remind myself to do something, I can send myself an email with To Do in the subject and it will automatically appear at the top of my Inbox, with all of my other mail displaying below.

I have also used this same process to filter out readings, blog posts, articles, etc that I want to follow up on. With these however, I need to apply the label (Readings) manually rather than using the filter.

Thanks to filters and Priority Inbox I am able to stay (a little) more organised all within one system.

EdTech tips and tools from the week – 9th Sept 2011

TIPS

Unfortunately didn’t get around to any readings this week – it’s been a busy one. A few handy tools below however. Enjoy!

 

TOOLS

KinderChat (via @hechternacht)

  • A lovely wiki hosting all of the tools and resources that emerge from the #kiinderchat on twitter. You don’t need to use twitter to benefit from the chats – simply go to this site to see all of their resources.

Lexilogos – multi-language dictionaries and multi-language keyboard inputs

  • This is a great site with loads of multi-language supports.
  • My favourite feature is the Multi-Lingual Keyboard. It displays an onscreen keyboard in loads of languages and also takes phonetic keyboard input. For example, when I type ka on my keyboard using the Japanese keyboard, the input on the screen is か. Used in conjunction with www.google.com/translate, this tool may well save the sanity of many ESOL learners and their teachers.

Edheads (via @deir75)

  • Some great interactive, child (sometimes older child) friendly resources on the human body, simple machines and the like.

7 Ideas in 7 Minutes (via @ianaddison)

  • Some fantastic resources for teachers, displayed in a 7 minute video.
  • There are some excellent tools for early childhood/kindergarten educators.

5 gmail tips for teachers via @jutecht

  • A last minute inclusion, this blog post from Jeff Utecht gives 5 great tips to help you manage your email – if you use gmail or Google Apps for Education at your campus. I make use of every one of these tips every day!