Are you teaching half-speak?

‘Half-speak’ is the term that I give to the relatively new ability to type with predictive text in mind. That is, learning to expect and accept predictive words before having to type the whole word. For example, if I want to type the word February I actually only need to type febr before I can then touch the spacebar to accept the full word.

I’ve recently been working in some grade 1 classes where we’ve been using the iPads to publish some stories that they’ve recently written and it was during these classes that I realized the students, although most have used idevices before, were not sure about what to do with the predictive text. From this, a just in time teaching experience occurred and the kids were amazed by how this feature made their typing easier.

As this technology continues to enhance, I can see it learning our personal preferences and writing styles. So much so, that predictive text may move beyond predicting a particular word to finishing sentences for us. Whether predictive text reaches this level or not, I can see users learning to type only half a word before hitting space, hence the term ‘half-speak’.

So, are you helping your students to use technology to their advantage? What other technology features do you think are important to teach out kids?

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R.I.P. handwriting…

The age of teaching handwriting is finished!

With the continual development of technology features such as predictive text, autocorrect and speech recognition, along with the rapidly developing field of mobile technology giving us access to these tools whenever we need to ‘write’, it’s safe to say that we no longer need to handwrite. Well, at least not in length. Don’t get me wrong, I still believe that students in the younger years of schooling need to learn to form letters as they learn to read them. However, gone are the days of cursive lessons, pen licences and dotted thirds. I believe that it is likely that handwriting will become a type of art form in the same sense that calligraphy is for my generation. 

So what does this mean for teaching and learning? Well, for anyone who has been the victim of a grammatically correct, yet contextually wrong, predictive text, or a ‘sometimes hilarious, sometimes awkward and sometimes downright embarrassing’ autocorrect (see www.damnyouautocorrect.com for examples of any of these), the skills associated with proofreading and editing are going to be (and already are) essential for our students. 

Here are some tips that students should be learning and using to ensure they are able to communicate clearly and accurately whenever ‘writing’ using modern technology: 

  • learn to touch type – or at least learn to efficiently track what you are writing as you write it so that you can check the autocorrects and predictions that your computer is making as you go (just as mine has done 4 times in this sentence).
  • learn NOT to hit send, print, publish etc – give it time, think it through and most importantly read it over to consider your purpose and to check for errors. Then hit send, print, publish, etc.
  • understand your grammar – in order to know whether the autocorrect or prediction is correct, you need to know what is correct.
  • know spelling blends – English is an awful language to work with. It’s full of rules that apply most of the time, but not always. However, if you know what that tricky spelling might be, then chances are auto-correct or spell check with help you out.
  • use your tools – further to the above point, making use of dictionary or ‘look up’ tools built in to many browsers, word processors and some operating systems will allow you to check the meaning to ensure the word you have is correct.
  • READ IT OVER! – did I say this already? Yes, but it’s just so important that it needs to be said again.
Spending the time on teaching these skills and giving your students the chance to practice them, rather than on handwriting, will be time far better spent for both you and the students.